Search

GH-09

All of the equipment inside the low-carbon energy plant is intended to be painted green, in order to create a true “Green House”.

GH-08

The facade of the low-carbon energy plant becomes a vitrine of urban agriculture at night.

GH-07

This animation showcases the pathway through the Creative Energy pipe and glimpses into the plant and greenhouse. The sequence of the pathway follows an inversion of the way the energy is produced and its by-products are utilized. When visitors first enter into the Creative Energy pipe, they are immediately taken up to the greenhouse level through an elevator. The pipe then ramps down through the greenhouse and plant below until it reaches back down to the ground level.

GH-06

The Green House consists of a low-carbon energy plant at the base, which is organized into 3 distinct areas – fuel storage, heat generation and emissions control. The wood waste fuel will consist of a mixture of park and yard trimmings, clean wood waste from construction, demolition and land clearing, and clean wood waste from commercial and industrial operations. On top of the plant sits the greenhouse in which the stacks from the plant below extend through.

GH-04

The plant will be enveloped by a functional greenhouse, which utilizes the by-products of the plant in order to grow up to 400 tonnes of organic fruit and vegetables per year.

GH-03

Visitors can experience the production of food and energy by taking a journey through the Creative Energy pipe, an interactive walkway, which has an integrated continuous glass wall that offers specific views into the low-carbon energy plant below and the greenhouse at the top.

GH-02

Visitors can experience the production of food and energy by taking a journey through the Creative Energy pipe, an interactive walkway, which has an integrated continuous glass wall that offers specific views into the low-carbon energy plant below and the greenhouse at the top.

GH-01

In support of Vancouver’s 2030 Greenest City Action Plan, Creative Energy has proposed a low-carbon energy plant (utilizing wood waste) located in the industrial flats which will reduce GHG emissions in Vancouver by 80,000 tonnes – the equivalent of removing 14,000 cars off the road a year. The energy produced by this plant will not only serve the upcoming development in the area, but also connect back to Creative Energy’s existing plant at 720 Beatty Street in order to make the existing system low-carbon.

BIGU-02

Lower East Side before a storm: The Big U not only shields the city against floods and storm water; it provides social and environmental benefits to the community, and fosters an improved public realm.

BIGU-03

Lower East Side during a storm: The Big U not only shields the city against floods and storm water; it provides social and environmental benefits to the community, and fosters an improved public realm

BIGU-06

Where the FDR lifts off from the ground and creates a gloomy underside, BIG worked with the local residents on the design to improve the mood of this space. Illuminated art pieces by local artists are proposed for the underside of the FDR – A Sistine Chapel of street art.

BIGU-07

The art pieces can fold down to form temporary enclosures for events such as a Christmas market—or they can all come down to resist the sea.

BIGU-08

The pavilions within the BIGU will animate the highway undersides and hold back the water. These pavilions are placed in such a way that the waterfront view will always be retained from the adjoining side-streets and only right before a storm, will the walls slide out to enclose the perimeter.

BIGU-01

During the Rebuild by Design competition, the design team was asked – What if the resilience infrastructure for Lower Manhattan wasn’t a wall between the city and the water, but rather a string of pearls of social and environmental amenities tailored to their specific neighborhoods, which also happens to shield their various communities from flooding?

BIGU-04

The Big U is a protective system that encircles Manhattan, responding to the needs and concerns of the island’s diverse communities. Stretching from West 57th Street south to The Battery and up to East 42nd Street, the Big U protects 10 continuous miles of low-lying geography that comprise an incredibly dense, vibrant, and vulnerable urban area.

BIGU-09

A small-scale study model of the BIG U.

BIGU-05

The team behind the Big U has envisioned three compartments that function independently to provide flood protection. Each compartment comprises of a physically discrete flood-protection zone that can be isolated from flooding in adjacent zones. At the same time, each compartment presents opportunities for integrated social and community planning. The compartments work in unison to protect and enhance the city, yet each compartment’s proposal is designed to stand on its own.

SUK-01

This urban park by BIG + TOPOTEK1 + SUPERFLEX is conceived as a giant exhibition of urban best practice by incorporating everyday objects from more than 60 different cultures, constitutes a rare fusion of architecture, landscape and art.

SUK-02

The urban park is 1-kilometer long runs through the Nørrebro area just North of Copenhagen’s city center, creating a different yet unifying spaces in one of the most ethnically diverse and socially challenged neighbourhoods in Denmark.

SUK-03

Superkilen is divided into three color-coded areas, each with a distinct atmospheric and functional condition: the large and expansive red square which serves as an extension of the adjacent sports hall offering a range of recreational and cultural activities; the black square as the heart of the Superkilen where locals can meet by the Moroccan fountain or a game of chess; and a linear green stretch as a natural meeting place for large-scale sports activities providing vantage points over the surroundings.

SUK-04

Superkilen is divided into three color-coded areas, each with a distinct atmospheric and functional condition: the large and expansive red square which serves as an extension of the adjacent sports hall offering a range of recreational and cultural activities; the black square as the heart of the Superkilen where locals can meet by the Moroccan fountain or a game of chess; and a linear green stretch as a natural meeting place for large-scale sports activities providing vantage points over the surroundings.

SUK-05

Superkilen is a surrealist collection of global urban diversity of more than 100 objects from 60 cultures which reflect the true nature of the local neighbourhood.

SUK-06

A bike path runs through the entire park improving the infrastructure locally in the area while integrating it into the broader, citywide context.

SUK-07

Throughout the Superkilen red maple, Japanese cherry trees, larix, palm trees from China and Lebanese cedar trees are planted to offer more shade and vegetative interest, augmenting the existing trees. The diversity in tree and plant species complements the diversity of the site furniture.

BEAT-01

Creative Energy’s existing steam plant is located at 720 Beatty in Vancouver. The plant is now 50 years old and is requiring upgrades to its existing infrastructure. The existing plant sits on top of one of Downtown Vancouver’s largest undeveloped sites and is located adjacent to the Georgia Street viaducts. The City of Vancouver intends to remove the viaducts and connect Georgia Street directly down to Pacific Street which will create a new gateway and ceremonial street into Downtown Vancouver. This site has the opportunity to be redeveloped into a new gateway building at this new entry point into Downtown.

BEAT-02

The proposed redevelopment offers almost 600,000 sqft of office space on top of the existing steam plant. The redevelopment will allow Creative Energy to upgrade their existing infrastructure to increase resiliency and redundancy in their system, inclusive of the creation of a new off-site plant at the base of BC Place Stadium.

The undulating shape of the building maximizes the size of the floorplate which is attractive to creative economy tenants, while also maximizing access to natural light for the interior occupants.

BEAT-03

Since the redevelopment will encompass the existing steam plant, there is essential infrastructure that will run through the redevelopment such as the stacks from the boilers. Rather than just covering up the Creative Energy infrastructure, the redevelopment will celebrate it.
This view inside the office lobby features the stacks from the plant below running through the ceiling space.

BEAT-04

Located adjacent to the large sports venues of BC Place Stadium and Rogers arena, the building sits at the transition point between the entertainment district and Downtown Vancouver’s CBD.

BEAT-05

The public realm will be animated with retail, a breezeway running underneath the building and a new public plaza.

BEAT-06

The new public plaza between the building and BC Place will allow the public to look down into Creative Energy’s plant below.

BEAT-08

Creative Energy is a neighbourhood energy leader that owns and operates one of the largest district energy networks in Canada. Located in Downtown Vancouver, Creative Energy’s system serves over 210 buildings through 14 kilometres of underground pipe.

In Canada and internationally, neighbourhood energy systems are inherently more environmentally friendly than large-scale energy grids, making them vital to our efforts to mitigate climate change. In a dense downtown neighbourhood, the Creative Energy system means there is only one central ‘boiler system’ instead of over hundreds of individual boilers systems resulting in cleaner air, lower greenhouse gas emissions, long-term sustainability, and lower energy costs for a large portion of the community.

BEAT-09

A view from Beatty Street looking Northeast towards the breezeway underneath the building.

BEAT-10

Once the Georgia Street viaducts are removed, this redevelopment will become a gateway building into Downtown Vancouver.

BEAT-11

The existing steam headers from Creative Energy’s plant cannot be moved so the redevelopment will celebrate this interface with the new public plaza and sidewalks.

BEAT-12

The building will feature 35,000 sqft office floorplates for creative economy tenants.

BEAT-13

In order to redevelop over top of the existing plant, Creative Energy intends to build a new satellite plant across the street at the base of BC Place Stadium. This will make Creative Energy’s system more redundant and resilient.

TELUS-01

View inside the TELUS Sky office lobby looking towards the 11-storey atrium that separates the tower from the adjacent building.

TELUS-02

As seen from this “Hockey Night in Canada” view, the silhouette of TELUS Sky expresses the unification of the two programs in a single gesture to create a feminine figure within the masculine skyline of Calgary.

TELUS-03

While TELUS Sky is reminiscent of Vancouver House and has been described by some as the ‘upside-down’ version of the tower, it is the result of an idea Bjarke Ingels calls “Bigamy”:
“Quite often the potential for innovation is to explore seeming mutually exclusive concepts. As soon a you mix things and explore the overlaps between programs you can explore synergies.”

TELUS-04

This building is designed to seamlessly accommodate the transformation from working to living as the tower takes off from the ground to reach the sky. The large floor plates for workplaces recede to achieve the slender dimensions of residential floor depths as well as balconies.

TELUS-05

Looking West from Centre Street, the lower 3 floors are comprised of the office and residential lobbies and retail space. At the base of the tower, select pixels have been extruded to enhance the arrival experience at the corner of Centre Street and 7th Avenue.

TELUS-07

Hundreds of thousands of LED lights have been integrated into the building façade of TELUS Sky, which is the platform for Doug Coupland’s public art installation.

TELUS-11

A photograph of Doug Coupland during a mockup of the lit façade in 2017. The colouring and patterning of the lights in this photograph were designed by Doug and named “Doug Random”.

TELUS-09

A view of the TELUS Sky podium facing the main entry point at the corner of Centre Street and 7th Avenue.

TELUS-08

Small scale study models from 2012 which allow BIG to revisit the evolution of the project at any given time.

TELUS-10

A photograph of Doug Coupland in 2017 from an adjacent terrace during a mockup of the lit façade.

LEG0-01

Located in central Billund – the birthplace of the LEGO brick nearly 100 years ago – BIG brings the toy scale of the classic brick to an architectural scale, forming vast exhibition spaces and public squares that embody the culture and values at the heart of all LEGO experiences: imagination, creativity, fun, learning, caring and quality.

LEGO-02

The top-most LEGO-style block crowning the experience center, the Keystone Gallery, showcases three-dimensional art beneath eight circular skylights that resemble the 2 x 4 studs on the iconic LEGO brick. Like the golden ratio, the 2 x 4 LEGO brick proportions are nested in the geometries of everything man-made, from the glazed ceramic tiles in the steps and walls to the overall 21 block scheme.

LEGO-03

The 15m tall Tree of Creativity welcomes the visitors in the ground floor lobby and is one of the largest LEGO structures ever built.

LEGO-04

Due to its central location on the site of Billund’s former city hall, the stacked-block formation of the 23 m tall LEGO House is conceived as an urban space as much as architecture: a series of 21 overlapping blocks surround and shelter a 2,000 m2 city plaza, while creating a mountain of interconnected terraces and roof playgrounds accessible to the public. The ground floor is energized by an urban character, welcoming locals and visitors to the café, LEGO brand store, conference facilities and three restaurants.

LEGO-05

The interconnected public and private outdoor terraces are color coded just like the spaces inside, and allow citizens and visitors to experience a 360° panoramic view of their hometown.

LEGO-06

The interconnected public and private outdoor terraces are color coded just like the spaces inside, and allow citizens and visitors to experience a 360° panoramic view of their hometown.

LEGO-08

Animation of the Lego House.

LEGO-07

Lego House – the Home of the Brick – is an education and experience hub for LEGO fans of all ages, as well as an architectural landmark and new city center for the citizens of Billund. The construction of the 12,000 m2 Home of the Brick commenced in 2014 with support from three generations of the LEGO family attracting 250,000+ visitors annually.

LEGO-10

A photograph of Doug Coupland in 2017 from an adjacent terrace during a mockup of the lit façade.

LEGO-11

The first and second floors are part of the ticketed experience areas which include the Masterpiece Gallery, a collection of LEGO fans’ beloved creations, as well as four play zones arranged by color and programmed with activities that represent a certain aspect of a child’s learning: red is creative, blue is cognitive, green is social, and yellow is emotional.

LEGO-12

On opposite ends of LEGO House, visitors can see one of two blocks cascade in pixelated stair steps and use it to access the public rooftops or as informal auditoria for people watching or public performances.

KING-18

The materiality of the building façade is glass block due to its reflective, refractive and translucent qualities. Reflecting the urban environment during the day and glowing at night, this unique facade material allows the building to constantly be evolving and changing.

KING-01

The building is organized as a traditional perimeter block with a courtyard in the center – this is a view inside the courtyard looking out towards King Street W. The courtyard is defined by two distinct atmospheres: a lushly landscaped forest at the East paired next to an urban, hardscaped court at the West. The resulting balance between these perceived opposites is a reflection of Toronto’s current state of rapid redevelopment: the union of old and new, an open community atmosphere in an intimate setting, calming green scenery within a bustling urban context.

KING-02

Existing pedestrian laneways are preserved and connected to this generous public space, which forms the unifying missing puzzle piece of the emerging North – South axis of the district. This view is taken from Brant Street looking towards the main passageway through the courtyard to the Wellington Street at the South.

KING-03

The building is accessible and visible from all sides making it an urban connector rather than a conventional building with a front facade and a back of house. The South lane, which backs onto a new park off Wellington Street will be animated through a series of smaller retailers.

KING-04

At the base, pixels lift to provide 24/7 access across the courtyard, which will become a new destination for the neighbourhood. At the South, a large archway frames the access from the new park off Wellington Street into the courtyard.

KING-05

KING is situated in a transitional area of Toronto. From the tall towers of the Central Business District in the East, to the low-rise neighbourhoods in the Northwest, the skyline is a mark of the city’s progress. Located at a crossroads of the established East-West corridor of King West with the emerging North-South connection from St. Andrews playground to the waterfront, the proposed mixed-use development will feature a public plaza and courtyard at the heart of King West while connecting the site to its surroundings through various pedestrian pathways that crisscross the area.

KING-06

Surrounding this courtyard, KING rises as sets of pixels extruded upwards to create space for housing, retail and boutique offices—avoiding the footprints of heritage buildings that already exist on the site. Each pixel is set at the size of a room; rotated 45 degrees from the street grid to increase exposure to light and air.

KING-08

This is a conceptual view from one of the terraces looking into the central courtyard, which shows an older iteration of the building façade materiality as pre-cast concrete. The central courtyard will provide a significant opportunity for a large suspended art installation.

KING-07

Each home will have access to outdoor space in the form of terraces, balconies or balconettes, all overlooking the undulating roofscape above the central courtyard.

KING-09

A view from Wellington Street of the new park and South façade of KING. The building is broken up into four distinct peaks and valleys, which allow sunlight to reach the public plaza below. The resulting undulating façade is a connective topography—allowing increased circulation through the neighbourhood while creating an abundance of green space normally reserved for the suburbs.

KING-10

A presentation by Bjarke Ingels in 2016 on the initial design of KING.

KING-12

Initial landscape architecture design concepts from Public Work.

KING-14

BIG’s design process is very iterative: small and large-scale study models are made continuously from the first ideas to the finished design, making it possible to revisit the evolution of the project.

KING-13

Initial interior design concepts for the public spaces and homes by BIG.

MECA-01

The new Maison del’Economie Creative et de la Culture en Aquitaine, MÉCA, is located on the historical riverfront of Bordeaux.  MÉCA will house three regional visual and performing arts agencies, FRAC, the ECLA and the OARA into one single building.

MECA-02

The multiple ramps and stairs inside the building will make the MÉCA a lively place and a natural extension of the life along the Quai de Paludate street and the new promenade.

MECA-03

During festivals or other special occasions in the city, the outside of the MÉCA can be transformed into a stage for outdoor concerts, theatrical spectacles or art installations.

MECA-08

Photograph of one of the study models for MÉCA.

MECA-06


Video of the MÉCA under construction.

MECA-07

The building is conceived as a single loop of public space and cultural institutions as the pavement promenade rises to form the roof of the main lobbies, ascends vertically along the stage tower of OARA then bridges across the promenade with the sky lit galleries of the FRAC, and returns vertically to the ground at the archives of the ECLA in order to reunite with the waterfront promenade.

MECA-04

The urban room allows everyday life of Bordeaux to flow through its generous frame along the promenade, injecting the art into the city and the city life into the building.

ARC-07

This project is the single largest environmental initiative in Denmark with a budget of 3.5 Billion DKK. It replaces the adjacent 40-year-old Amagerforbraending plant, integrating the latest technologies in waste treatment and environmental performance.

ARC-06

Access to the slopes is via an elevator along the plant’s smokestack, providing views into the plant and giving glimpses into its internal workings. As you reach the observation platform 100m above the ground, sightseers are provided with unobstructed views from one of the tallest structures in Copenhagen.

ARC-02

The roof of the new Amagerforbraending has been transformed into a 31.000 m2 ski slope with varying skill levels for the citizens of Copenhagen and its neighbouring municipalities and visitors. This project redefines the relationship between the existing waste-plant and the city by expanding the existing recreational activities in the surrounding area into a new breed of waste-to-energy plant.

ARC-03

The power plant is located in an industrial area of Copenhagen, where locals have gone to drive go-carts or water-ski for many years.

ARC-01

Instead of considering the new Amager Bakke as an isolated architectural object, the building was conceived as a destination in itself and reflects the progressive vision for a new type of waste treatment facility.

ARC-08

The ski-slope has been created with a recycled synthetic granular in the absence of much snow in Copenhagen.

ARC-05

Located in an industrial area near the city center, ARC will be an exemplary model in the field of waste management and energy production/

ARC-09

This new plant has become an architectural landmark in the cityscape of Copenhagen.

VAN-01

Vancouver House was the first collaboration between BIG and Westbank, starting in 2011. Located right at the entrance into Downtown Vancouver at the Granville Street bridgehead, the form of the tower announces the entry point into downtown Vancouver from the Granville Street bridge forming a gateway to the city.

The sculptural form of the building is a direct response to the complex conditions of the site. At its base, a 30m setback from the Granville Street bridge/on-ramp dictates a triangular footprint for the building. As the site ascends in elevation however, the tower is able to clear the required 30m setback zone in order to expand and transform the triangular floorplate into a rectangular one.

VAN-02

Vancouver House is comprised of 4 buildings as shown in this photograph of the building model from the north. The base of the tower on the far right is Building 1, the tower is Building 2 and the two smaller triangular buildings flanking the Granville Street bridge are Building’s 3 and 4. Building 1 is comprised of retail, 105 rental residential units and the pool and outdoor terrace for the tower. Building 2 is comprised of 375 residential units and Building’s 3 and 4 are comprised of retail at the base and Creative Spaces up above.

VAN-03

The triangular voids in the centre of Building’s 3 and 4 create communal courtyards clad in Ipe wood for both the users of the Creative Space as well as the general public. The courtyards are accessible from within the Creative Spaces, the street, as well as directly off the Granville Street bridge through a small secondary bridge connection.

VAN-04

You can see from this aerial view looking Southwest the 4 separate buildings that Vancouver House is comprised of. The project is flanked by Pacific Street to the North and Howe Street to the West. Running through the development beneath the Granville Street bridge are Continental Street, Granville Street and Rolston Street.

VAN-05

A view from Pacific Street showing the retail within Building 1 with the residential tower behind.

VAN 06

A view from the tower looking down, the rooftops of Building’s 1, 3 and 4 all feature green roofs and courtyards clad in Ipe wood.

VAN-09

Since the start of construction, photographer Trevor Martin has been capturing the construction of the project from multiple vantage points.

VAN-10

The public art for Vancouver House is the Spinning Chandelier by Rodney Graham. This large-scale chandelier will be suspended from the underside of the Granville Street bridge and spin and torque throughout the day until it releases once a day in the evening.

VAN-11

Small scale study models from 2011 which allow BIG to revisit the evolution of the project at any given time.

VAN-12

The public realm underneath the Granville Street bridge is called the Beach District. Rather than ignoring the surrounding infrastructure, the Beach District will be animated through the retail within then podiums of Building’s 1, 3 and 4, shipping container micro-retail-units and the public art at the underside of the bridge deck above.

Please Check the ID
clear